HomeContac UsProductsPricingDemos/UpdatesDownloadsSupportRegisterSpecial OffersPress ReleasesMiscellaneousSearch

 

Year 2000 Readiness Disclosure

(Year 2000 Statement)


This statement is issued by and with the approval of Prairie Group, Inc. (including its subsidiaries and affiliated companies, namely PrairieSoft, Inc. and Advanced Software, L.C.)

Legal notice specified by federal law for those customers reading our Year 2000 Readiness Disclosure Statement prior to purchasing a product from us: Statements made to you in the course of this sale are subject to this Year 2000 Information and Readiness Disclosure Act (XX U.S.C. XX). In the case of a dispute, this Act may reduce your legal rights regarding the use of any such statements, unless otherwise specified by your contract or tariff.

The Year 2000 problem (Y2K)

As we approach the year 2000 everyone is talking about the problem that some computers are going to have. It is primarily a problem with some older mainframe computers. As a way to save valuable data storage space, the computer programs only stored the last two digits of the year making it impossible to distinguish between the years 2000 and 1900. This technique was sometimes carried over to personal computers and some programs were written to assume that all dates were 19xx. These programs may not work properly beginning on January 1, 2000.

Leap Year and Other Date Problems

Several other broader date issues have been included in the Y2K issue. The following issues have been considered in this statement and disclosure: 1) the 99th day of 1999, 2) the 9th day of the 9th month of 1999, and that the year 2000 is a leap year. (Of interest: leap years are any year divisible by 4, unless it is also divisible by 100; however, any century year that is divisible by 400 is a leap year.)

The Mac OS and the Year 2000

We believe, but do not warrant, that the current Apple Macintosh and the Mac OS-compatible computers and operating systems will have no problem working as expected with our programs well beyond the year 2000.

The Windows OS and the Year 2000

We believe, but do not warrant, that all of Microsoft's current operating systems will have no problem working as expected with our programs well beyond the year 2000.

Prairie Group and the Year 2000

Even with the computer's operating system being able to handle the year 2000, it is possible for a program to be written to not take advantage of this capability. To the best of our knowledge all current Prairie Group products (see list below) are written to handle the year 2000 properly. We continue to monitor our software programs and will disclose any issues which are discovered. NO WARRANTY IS EXPRESS OR IMPLIED OTHER THAN IS INCLUDED IN THE SOFTWARE LICENSE AND LIMITED WARRANTY WHICH ACCOMPANIED THE PRODUCT. Prairie Group is only evaluating the current versions of our products for year 2000 compliance. To make sure you have the most current version of our products, check out our web page at http://www.prgrsoft.com/ and then click on the Products button.

Serious Year 2000 Problems

None of Prairie Group's programs are anticipated to cause "mission critical" problems due to a year 2000 problem, even if a year 2000 problem were to be discovered. [A "mission critical" problem is defined by example as the type problem the U.S. government will have if it can't issue Social Security checks on January 1, 2000.] We can, however, see how serious problems could occur with our products by people testing their computers for the year 2000 problem. Example: Many "experts" are recommending that you set your computer clock to 11:55 PM, December 31, 1999, turn off your computer, wait 10 minutes, turn your computer back on, and test all your programs. This is a very bad idea if you have alarms and reminders set in InTouch, DateView or Alarming Events. This test will cause our programs to think that it is the year 2000 and you have missed all your appointments between now and December 31, 1999. All your alarms that you have set will go off. Then when you reset your computer's clock to the correct time, our programs will think that they have notified you of your appointments and may not notify you again.

Definition of Year 2000 Compliance

There is currently no legal definition of "Year 2000 Compliance." New legislation, the Year 2000 (Y2K) Information Disclosure Act, signed by the president on October 19, 1998, defines a software program as having a Y2K problem if it is "not capable of recognizing certain dates in 1999 and after December 31, 1999, and will read dates in the year 2000 and thereafter as if those dates represent the year 1900 or thereafter or will fail to process those dates." Many businesses are trying to expand the definition to require that software programs display only 4-digit dates to be considered Y2K Compliant. We do not agree. Example: You would not be confused in January of the year 2000 if you received a message on our QuickConference instant messaging program which reads "Joe Smith 1/1/00 8:30 AM -- Can we meet at 10 o'clock on the new advertising budget?" Further, the format in which our QuickConference program prints the date, 2-digit year or 4-digit year, is selected by the user from within the computer's operating system.

Certification of Year 2000 Compliance

Since the beginning of the personal computer era, software has generally been sold without much of a warranty; i.e., either no warranty or a limited warranty. The customer has been best served by relying on the goodwill of the company and the desire to maintain a favorable reputation. Now software companies are being flooded with requests for warranties and certifications that their software is compliant in avoiding the year 2000 problem. We are continuing to rely solely on the original license and limited warranty which accompanied the software when we licensed it to you. In lieu of specific certifications, we are offering a periodic newsletter. See Our Pledge below.

Testing Procedures

If you feel the need for a copy of our testing procedures and results, please E-mail me at john.kirkx@xprgrsoft.com, including the words "Y2K testing" in the subject field. We will reply with questions and information needed prior to sending you our testing procedures and results. We will require a confidentiality agreement and indemnification statement prior to releasing this information as well as certification from you that you are in compliance with all the terms of the software license.

Editorial Comment

We do not believe it is necessary for us to feed a legal system which is trying to turn the year 2000 problem into another round of profitable class action lawsuits. Lawyers have become rich with asbestos, silicon implants, and smoking. Now they are looking to software and the Y2K problem. If you doubt this, PC Week March 9, 1998, p.83, reports that even the American Bar Association's ABA Journal, June 1997, has predicted that "legal and liability costs will far exceed the technical costs of fixing Y2K problems, estimated by Gartner Group Inc. to amount to $600 billion in the United States." What is sad is that the industry may be unnecessarily spending over a trillion dollars on legal and liability costs that would otherwise be available for improvements to existing software and development of new products.

Our Pledge

We will endeavor to do our best to provide the same excellent level of customer support and service which we have maintained since the beginning of the personal computer revolution. As part of this service we have begun an "as needed" newsletter by E-mail in which we will disclose any Y2K problems of which we have been notified or which we have discovered internally. You can get on the mailing list for this newsletter by sending an E-mail request to me at john.kirkx@xprgrsoft.com with the words "Y2K mailing list" in the subject field. Your inclusion in our mailing list will be confirmed within a reasonable time period. If you have not received a confirmation please reapply. In closing, I repeat our pledge that we will endeavor to do our best to provide the same level of customer support and service in which we pride ourselves.


John S. Kirk, President
Prairie Group, Inc.
March 25, 1998
Updated May 10, 1998
Updated November 20, 1998
Updated June 19, 1999


Product

Version

Number of Known Y2K errors

CalendarMaker

3.0.2

none

4.1v1

none - significant non-Y2K problem

4.1.2

none

4.5 - 4.5.2

none
DateView

2.6

none
DiskTop

4.5.2

one - find feature is only 19xx

4.5.3

none
InTouch with...

2.5

none - significant non-Y2K problem

2.5.1

none - update to v. 2.5.2 is unnecessary

2.5.2 - 2.5.3

none
In/Out

1.0.2

none
QuickConference

1.0

none - significant non-Y2K problem

1.0.1

none

1.5 - 1.5r2

none
List of other Prairie Group products:
Alarming Events

1.1

none
Amazing Paint

1.0.4

none
Calculator PS

1.0.1

none
MacBanner

2.0

none - [part of Amazing Paint]
 
List of other Prairie Group products for Macintosh System 6 for which no Y2K testing has been done, but for which no Y2K problems are known:
MacBillboard

4.1

 
MockPackage

4.4

 
  Aask

1.0

 
  Control-1

1.1

 
  EZ-Menus

1.1

 
  FolderShare

1.1

 
  HeapFixer

1.0.1

 
  LaserStatus

3.0.4

 
  MockChart

1.0

 
  MockPrinter

4.4

 
  MockTerminal

4.4

 
  MockWrite

4.4

 
  Widgets

3.0.4

 
QuickTools

1.0.3

 
  QuickToolbox

1.0.3

 
  QT/Barricade

1.0.3

 
  QT/Dialog Power!

1.0.3

 
  QT/Functionality

1.0.3

 
  QT/Instant Menus

1.0.3

 
  QT/Power Strip

1.0.3

 
  QT/Snipper

1.0.3

 
  QT/Sunset

1.0.3

 
  QT/Work Saver

1.0.3

 
 
List of other Prairie Group products for Apple II for which no Y2K testing has been done, but for which no Y2K problems are known:
Ledger System

2.0

 
Payroll System

2.0

 
SwordThrust

(all episodes)

 


All product names are trademarks of Prairie Group, Inc.



Read more about the Mac and the Year 2000 Problem in a MacWeek Article.
NOTE: MacWeek Article link is no longer active as of 2005 - http://macworld.zdnet.com/1999/10/features/y2k.html